Salmonid Restoration Federation
23 April - 26, 2019
Santa Rosa, California

Strategies for Improving Streamflow

26 April 2019
1:30pm - 5:00pm

Session Coordinators: 
Matt Clifford, Trout Unlimited, California Water Project
Sarah Nossaman Pierce, CA Sea Grant

 

Insufficient oversummer streamflow is a significant limiting factor to salmonid recovery in many of coastal California’s intermittent streams, including several of the highest priority coho salmon streams in the Russian River watershed. The long-term impacts of drought, anthropogenic water use and landscape-scale changes, as well as local groundwater dynamics and environmental factors, must be considered when developing effective strategies for flow improvements. This session will focus on practical and innovative approaches to enhancing summer streamflow. Possible topics include (but are not limited to) collaborative and watershed-scale efforts that address this complex issue, strategies for setting and achieving flow targets, challenges and techniques associated with effective project implementation, guidance on navigating the permit process and water rights laws, and efforts to include groundwater dynamics and other environmental factors in project development.

Planning and Implementing Streamflow Improvement Projects in the Russian River Watershed with the Coho Partnership
Jessica Pollitz, P.E., Sonoma Resource Conservation District

Just Add Water: an Overview of Small-scale Flow Releases and Monitoring Tools to Support Salmonid Recovery in the Lower Russian River Basin
Elizabeth Ruiz, California Sea Grant

Addressing Land Use Impacts to Restore Dry Season Flows
Tasha McKee, Sanctuary Forest Inc.

Lessons Learned from Agricultural Water Storage Projects in Coastal San Mateo County
Joe Issel, San Mateo Resource Conservation District

Water Right Permitting for Streamflow Enhancement Projects in Coastal California Watersheds – Practical Concerns and Policy Issues
Matt Clifford and Mary Ann King, Trout Unlimited

Challenges in Evaluating the Effectiveness of Streamflow Enhancement Efforts
John Green, Gold Ridge Resource Conservation District